Research Programs
The USPOULTRY industry research grants program encompasses all segments of broiler, turkey, and commercial egg operations. Approximately $2.7 million is currently invested in ongoing research. Use the tabs below for abstract submission details or to search for completed research abstracts.

  • Search Abstracts
  • Proposal Guidelines
  • Deadlines for Applying
  • Identified Research Needs
  • Proposal Format
  • Final Report Format
  • Beard Research Excellence Award
  • Board Research Initiative - Salmonella
  • Board Research Initiative - Poultry Well-Being
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Note: The letter "R" within a project number denotes the project was funded by the Poultry Protein & Fat Council. Projects funded by the U.S. Poultry & Egg Harold E. Ford Foundation have an "F" in the project number.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Proposal Submission Guidelines
If you wish to submit a Poultry Protein & Fat Council research proposal, please go here to access the correct format.

The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association is dedicated to the growth, progress, and welfare of the poultry industry and all of its individual and corporate interests. The promotion of problem-related research and the concomitant training of graduate students is high on the association's agenda.

Each year, the association allocates approximately $600,000 for the funding of research projects that benefit the poultry and egg industry. Research results are publicized in the industry press and made available to potential users.

Who selects the projects that are funded?
Research proposals are judged by a 15-member panel composed of industry scientists and technical specialists representing a cross section of disciplines and responsibilities. Panelists evaluate more than 100 proposals each year to determine their value and potential benefit to the poultry and egg industry.

The committee's recommendations are referred to the association's board of directors for funding. Currently approximately 16 percent of proposals submitted to USPOULTRY are recommended for funding by the committee.

Are there guidelines to follow?
Researchers should submit only a one-page preproposal summary that describes the problem(s) they wish to address, what they propose to do, and how their proposed project relates to USPOULTRY's published research priorities. A title, the researcher's name and affiliation, and an email address should be included on the preproposal. Details of procedures or budget specifics should not be included in the submissions. PREPROPOSALS SHOULD BE SUBMITTED IN MICROSOFT WORD FORMAT to vchalker@uspoultry.org.

The outcome of the preproposal review will be one of three responses:
1. Send a full research proposal for consideration.
2. USPOULTRY is not interested in funding research on the proposed subject; or
3. Please make some modifications in what you are proposing and then send a full proposal. Preproposals should address any important area, including poultry management, nutrition, food safety, processing, disease, and waste disposal.

Full proposals should be prepared according to published USPOULTRY guidelines. All proposals should be written with minimal jargon so that professionals from all disciplines can understand them. Successful proposals are directed toward an important industry problem; clearly written with well defined objectives; and reasonably priced with realistic budgets.

How can the money be used?
Funds can be used for graduate students, technicians, research supplies, and work and meeting travel. Up to 15 percent overhead is allowed. Funds cannot be used for professional (faculty or postdoc) salaries or equipment.

The USPOULTRY industry research grants program encompasses all segments of broiler, turkey, and commercial egg operations. Approximately $2.7 million is currently invested in ongoing research. Use the tabs below for abstract submission details or to search for completed research abstracts.

Board Research Initiatives:
DEADLINE FOR PRE-PROPOSAL SUBMISSION IS APRIL 18, 2014. See Tabs on Website for Special Topics.

Fall 2014 Competition:
Research preproposals should arrive in the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association office by close of business (5:00 p.m. EDT) on May 1, 2014. USPOULTRY will e-mail requests for full proposals on June 6, 2014. Full proposals are due at USPOULTRY by close of business (5:00 p.m. EDT) on July 18, 2014. Competition results announced September 19, 2014.

Spring 2015 Competition:
Research preproposals should arrive in the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association office by close of business (5:00 p.m. EDT) on November 3, 2014. USPOULTRY will e-mail requests for full proposals on December 5, 2014. Full proposals are due at USPOULTRY by close of business (5:00 p.m. EDT) on February 6, 2015. Competition results announced April 1, 2015.

Fall 2015 Competition:
Research preproposals should arrive in the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association office by close of business (5:00 p.m. EDT) on May 1, 2015. USPOULTRY will e-mail requests for full proposals on June 5, 2015. Full proposals are due at USPOULTRY by close of business (5:00 p.m. EDT) on July 17, 2015. Competition results announced September 11, 2015.

What are the deadlines for applying?
All deadlines are for arrival in the USPOULTRY office by close of business (5:00 p.m. EDT) on the date indicated. Preproposals only should be emailed to vchalker@uspoultry.org with "Preproposal" shown as the subject line. PREPROPOSALS SHOULD BE SUBMITTED IN MICROSOFT WORD FORMAT. If you do not receive an acknowledgement by return email, please contact us immediately.

If submitting a proposal, 10 copies of the full proposal must be mailed or sent via overnight delivery to arrive by the deadline. The full proposal must also be submitted via email in PDF FORMAT to vchalker@uspoultry.org.

Identified Research Needs (2014)

What needs have been identified?
Proposed research projects should be designed to provide information that has the potential to resolve real industry problems. The following list is organized by overall subject area. Items within each list are presented in priority order.

USPOULTRY realizes that new issues are always emerging and that scientists may see the importance of a potential problem that has not been recognized or cited as an industry research need. USPOULTRY invites proposals that address problems outside the industry lists but urges the submitter to provide ample background and justification to explain the need for the research.

Animal Welfare
1. Investigate methods to improve bird welfare during catching, cage unloading and bird movement through to shackling (including unloading area design).
2. Investigate alternatives to maceration for cull chicks or embyonated eggs.
3. Investigate methods to determine the causes and methods to prevent wing damage in broilers and turkeys.
4. Evaluate methods of euthanasia, specifically for broilers, turkeys, layers or breeders.
5. Validate quantitative method(s) to evaluate bird welfare. Method may be specific to a particular area of production.
6. Define the contribution of genetic selection, incubation, nutrition, and management to leg weakness and skeletal problems and devise strategies to ameliorate these problems.
7. Investigate practices to maintain ammonia levels under 25 ppm year round.
8. Evaluate the effects of probiotics/feed supplements on gut health.
9. Develop objective methods of animal welfare comparisons for various housing systems.
10. Investigate alternatives to electrical stunning.
11. Devise and test improves conveyances and methods for reducing bird stress, injuries and enhancing product quality and public image in live transport.
12. Evaluate carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, humidity and ammonia sensors to monitor air quality.
13. Develop improved chick delivery methods to lessen chick and employee stress.

Breeder Management (Broiler/Turkey)
1. Develop rapid, non-destructive, and quantitative methods for determining egg microbiological quality for routine quality control practices: hatching eggs
2. Optimal nest requirements for broiler and turkey breeders.
3. Prevention management of early male aggressiveness. Optimizing male body weight profiles and mating ratios.
4. Develop improved methods for egg management, sanitation and storage to optimize chick quality.
5. Establish feeding and lighting schedules for pullets/hens and turkey breeder hens for maximum production/hatchability.
6. Determine etiology, epidemiology, prevention, and control measures for mortality of breeder hens and roosters from housing to peak production.
7. Determine the pathophysiology, prevention, and control of cyanosis in broiler breeder males.
8. Determine cause and prevention of hen diuresis syndrome.
9. Management of ovary development and prevention of reproductive disorders.
10. Alternative feeding/nutrition management for replacement pullets to replace current feed restriction programs.

Meat Bird Management
1. Define and describe the microbiological effects of lay-out time, and interventions that can substitute for layout time (e.g., sanitation practices, litter composting, litter amendments, etc.)
2. Determine influence of spectrum, intensity, and photoperiod for different ages on performance and well being.
3. Compare different brooding methods using energy use, mortality, and growth rate as criteria.
4. Determine causes and prevention of early poult mortality.
5. Devise improved strategies for migration control in tunnel ventilated broiler housing.
6. Nutrition/Management programs to maximize performance in antibiotic-free production systems.

Commercial Egg Production
1. Develop rapid, non-destructive, and quantitative methods for determining egg microbiology quality for routine quality control practices in commercial eggs.
2. Devise environmentally acceptable and residue-free systems of fly control.
3. Devise practices to prevent the production of excessively large eggs, especially in molted flocks.

Diseases
1. Devise improved methods for the diagnosis and control of infectious Laryngotracheitis.
2. Determine risk factors, epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and control of the various cloistral diseases of poultry (gangrenous dermatitis, cloistral dermatitis, necrotic enteritis, focal duodenal necrosis, cholangiohepatitis, etc.).
3. Devise methods for prevention/reduction of pathogenic bacteria colonizing poultry.
4. Enhanced Gut Health - understanding and improving micro biome, including the mechanism and impact of prebiotics and probiotics; understanding host/pathogen interaction; develop strategies to manage gut health; improve diagnostics.
5. Determine the length of protection generated by killed bacterins, especially autogenous Salmonella bacterins.
6. Determine the risk factors, epidemiology, prevention, and control of viral arthritis (reovirus) infection in broilers and meat turkeys.
7. Develop a vaccine that will induce protection against all serotypes of IBV.
8. Improve the methods and tools for diagnosis, prevention an control of mycoplasma.
9. Develop improved methods and pharmaceuticals for prevention and control of helminthes and histomoniasis.
10. Determine optimum shuttle and rotation programs for anticoccidials and coccidiosis vaccines to improve and retain efficacy.
11. Determine the pathogenesis, risk factors, prevention, and control of subcutaneous cellulitis ("IP", infectious or inflammatory process) in broilers.
12. Determine the causes, risk factors, epidemiology, prevention and control of peritonitis in laying hens.
13. Determine the risk factors, epidemiology, prevention, and control of Enterococcus cecorum infections in roosters and broilers.
14. Investigate the causes, prevention and control of so-called Runting and Stunting Syndromes or cystic enteropathies.
15. Devise improved methods for the diagnosis and control of variant strains of Infectious Bronchitis.
16. Determine the causes, risk factors, epidemiology, prevention, and control of bacterial arthritis and osteomyelitis in breeders, broilers and meat-type turkeys.
17. Develop improved vaccine delivery systems for killed and live vaccines that improve accuracy of delivery, and in the case of killed vaccines, improves worker safety, decreases contamination, and reduces injection site infections.
18. Develop improved adjuvants for killed vaccines and bacterins to increase immune responses, prolong antibody titers, and decrease tissue reaction.

Employee Safety Health
1. Industrial Hygiene monitoring and sampling protocols -- identify potential exposures and develop a protocol for determining permissible exposure levels and for determining required frequency and methodology for routine sampling -- including ammonia, chlorine, nuisance dusts, formaldehyde, carbon dioxide and a variety of airborne infectious diseases such as aspergillosis and histoplasmosis.
2. Determine the incidence of repetitive motion disorders in catchers and live hanging workers, and develop strategies to minimize these disorders.

Environmental Management
1. Define diets and withdrawal strategies to control contamination in processing.
2. Development of carbon footprint for various poultry industry sectors (feed mill, rendering, grow out, hatcheries, and processing plants) - or development of model to calculate carbon footprint for various sectors.
3. Devise methods for water reuse, conservation and recycling.
4. Impact of the use of poultry litter as a fertilizer both on soil quality and water quality.
5. Evaluate the economic efficiency and impact on production by various types of lighting sources.
6. Determine the impacts of food safety chemicals on wastewater treatment systems and methods to treat/mitigate effects.
7. Devise methods for odor and ammonia control from poultry production houses via diet manipulation, litter additives, etc.
8. Evaluate the effectiveness of BMP's to reduce air and water emissions from poultry farms.
9. Investigate economical and reliable methods and/or systems for reducing pollutants in storm water runoff, particularly fecal coliforms.

Feed Mill Operations
1. Estimate Salmonella and Campylobacter prevalence in poultry feeds, and significance/role of same in relation to Salmonella and Campylobacter prevalence in finished products.
2. Devise cost-effective ways to improve pellet quality.

Food Safety
1. Determine the risk factors and controls for pre-harvest food safety for Salmonella and Campylobacter.
2. Determine safe and effective antimicrobial applications to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter prevalence associated with mechanically deboned poultry, poultry parts, and heat treated (Not-Ready-To-Eat) poultry products, as well as the raw materials used to produce them.
3. Development of rapid methods for detecting foodborne pathogens.
4. Devise methods for prevention/reduction of pathogenic bacteria colonizing poultry.
5. Develop methods for cleaning deep skin Salmonella contamination in poultry carcasses or parts.
6. Validations for interventions: Identifying the critical monitoring parameters for Salmonella.
7. Develop post-chill handling methods to reduce microbial contamination.
8. Determine that portion of human Salmonella and Campylobacter infections that is scientifically linked to the consumption of poultry products.
9. Develop safe and cost efficient methods for reducing Salmonella contamination in poultry feeds.
10. Develop methods fro prevention of cross contamination and prevention of ingesta contamination leading to elimination of contamination on final product.
11. Evaluate effectiveness of carcass dips/sprays in reducing microbial contamination.
12. Define the impact of cleaning catching/hauling equipment on bacterial load on carcasses, especially Salmonella and Campylobacter.
13. Estimate Salmonella and Campylobacter prevalence in poultry feeds, and significance/role of same in relation to Salmonella and Campylobacter prevalence in finished products.

Further Processing
1. Devise improved and rapid methods for the detection of metal fragments, bone, and other foreign materials in meat.

Genetics
1. Devise ways to improve the immune response of poultry through genetics.
2. Define the contribution of genetic selection to leg weakness and skeletal problems and devise selection strategies to ameliorate these problems.
3. Develop Marek's resistance in chickens through genetics.

Hatchery Management
1. Devise and validate enhanced hatching egg management and operational sanitation methods to improve microbiological quality of hatching eggs and chicks while protecting worker safety.
2. Optimize incubation methods and operational parameters for maximum hatch and chick/poult quality.
3. Devise and validate measures to reduce stress and injuries in automated chick handling systems.
4.
Develop improved chick delivery methods to lessen chick and employee stress.

Human Nutrition
1. Compare the nutritional and microbiologic quality of poultry raised using organic and conventional methodologies, as well as consumer perceptions related to both.
2.
Compare the nutritional and microbiologic quality of organic and conventional eggs, as well as consumer perceptions related to both.

Live Haul
1. Define the impact of cleaning catching/hauling equipment on bacterial load on carcasses, especially Salmonella and Campylobacter.
2. Devise and test improved conveyances and methods for reducing bird stress, injuries and enhancing product quality and public image in live transport.

Nutrition
1. Determine the impact that various ingredient combinations have on the microbial status of the bird.
2. Determine the cost effectiveness of enzyme combinations that maximize energy and/or amino acid utilization from commonly fed feed ingredients.
3. Define diets and withdrawal strategies to control contamination in processing.
4. Define the optimal intestinal microflora for maximizing genetic potential of current broiler and turkey strains.
5. Define the nutritional factors that limit the use of DDGS in monogastric diets (fiber, available energy, available amino acids, fat stability, mycotoxin concentration impact, gut microflora impact) and devise viable, cost-effective options.
6. Determine the effects of feed texture on bird performance, feed production/handling, gut microflora status and bird health.
7. Determine the influence of breeder nutrition on chick and poult performance.
8. Determine how to feed meat birds to maximize leg strength.
9. Determine the energy content of the various corm hybrids currently being fed. Has the TME changed over time?
10. Post-peak feed reduction programs for broiler breeders.
11. Formulating diets for reducing problems associated with broiler breeder obesity causing leg deformity, brittle bone and breakage in cage layers, thus enhancing animal welfare.
12. Determine the optimal energy and protein needs of broiler breeders at various stages of production.

Poultry Housing
1. Optimize integrated pest management programs in live production.
2. Evaluate oxygen and ammonia sensors to monitor air quality.

Breeder Replacement Management
1. Develop new vaccination techniques to improve protection and lessen stress on the bird.
2. Determine optimal feeding techniques for weight and uniformity management and welfare (potential alternatives to skip a day feeding programs).
3. Determine optimum photoperiods, light intensity, and associated management factors (e.g., beak trimming) in relation to weight, uniformity, bird welfare and maturity.
4. Determine optimal male weights throughout life for best hatch.

Processing
1. Define the cause of "white striping" in chicken breast meat and determine procedures to reduce its incidence.
2. Develop methods for prevention of cross contamination and prevention of ingesta contamination leading to elimination of contamination on final product.
3. Determine effects of preslaughter stress on feather release, moisture gain/retention, and muscle tissue quality.
4. Define the effect of gas stunning on delay in defeathering, chilling, and meat quality in broilers and turkeys.
5. Determine the actual feasibility of irradiation of poultry meat.

Research Proposal Format

In what format should I submit my proposal?
Proposals must be submitted via email in PDF FORMAT to vchalker@uspoultry.org. In addition, ten copies of the proposal must be mailed or sent via overnight delivery to USPOULTRY. Proposals should be clipped securely or stapled; plastic covers or other types of binding are discouraged. The body of the proposal may be single- or double-spaced at the discretion of the researcher. Please copy front and back and provide page numbering.

FOR MAILED COPIES: If a cover letter is included, and the Applicant wishes it reviewed by the committee, then a copy of the letter should be attached to each proposal. Reprints of scientific or popular articles written by the investigator, dealing with prior research in the area of the proposal, are not required; however, if such reprints are supplied they will be circulated to the reviewers. Ten (10) copies should be supplied; each reprint clipped to the accompanying proposal.

FOR EMAILED COPIES: THE PROPOSAL SHOULD BE SUBMITTED IN PDF FORMAT AS ONE COMPLETE DOCUMENT. Cover letters, article reprints, letters of support, etc. should be included as a part of the complete PDF submission. If multiple documents are provided, only the proposal will be reviewed.

Please address each item of the format completely, but briefly:

Cover Sheet
Title of Project (limit of 180 characters/spaces)
Name of University (or research organization)
Principal Investigator (project leader or contact person)
Complete Address and Telephone Number
Department
Co-investigators
Date Submitted
Total Funds Requested
Duration of Project
Entity to Which the Check will be Made Payable with Complete Mailing Address
Keywords (up to four) optional

If the project will be administered by a university or an experiment station official, give the name and address of the official.

Abstract
The second page of a proposal is an abstract limited to one page of double-spaced typing. It should include the following:

A brief statement of the industry problem to be investigated;
The objectives of the research;
The approaches to be used to achieve the objectives; and
The probable value to the industry if the research objectives are achieved.

Proposal
Every effort should be made to limit the number of pages of Items 1-6 to 10 or less.

  1. Title of Project
  2. Investigator(s)
  3. Objectives: List the specific goals of the project.
  4. Justification: Justify the proposal in light of current industry practice or problems, and discuss the short- and long- range cost-benefit potential of achieving the objectives and how the proposed project relates to USPOULTRY's published research priorities.
  5. Procedures: Outline the protocol designed to achieve the objectives, including the experimental design, replications, etc. If confidential or proprietary information is contained in the proposal, it must be noted in bold type on the first sheet referencing page and paragraph. Pages and paragraphs must also be similarly highlighted.
  6. Literature Review:
    1. Please cite known research on the same subject (reference key investigators only).
    2. Indicate how this proposal differs from previous or current research.
  7. Resume of Investigator (one page)
  8. Current or Previous Research on Subject (if any) by Investigator
  9. Facilities and Equipment Required and Available for This Project
  10. Research Timetable:
    1. Date project is scheduled to begin.
    2. Date project is scheduled to end.
  11. Personnel Support Provided by the University (or research organization)
  12. Financial Support:
    1. From the university (or research organization).
    2. From other sources, including those from whom other funds for this project are requested.
  13. Institutional Units Involved
  14. Budget: Direct cost factors attributed to the project. Please itemize all areas of need. Include cost per animal unit, if any. Funds can be used for graduate students, technicians, research supplies, and work and meeting travel. Funds cannot be used for professional (faculty or postdoc) salaries or major equipment purchases.
  15. Total Funds Requested: Unexpended funds at the termination of the project may be used at the discretion of the principal investigator if these funds are no more than 5 percent of the total award or $1,000. Funds in excess of 5 percent of the award or $1,000 should be returned to USPOULTRY.
  16. Indirect Costs: The industry generated funds that support USPOULTRY research projects are not intended to provide the general overhead costs of research institutions. Proposals must allocate the lowest possible percentage of the funding for indirect costs, if at all. Indirect costs must be held to a minimum but never exceed 15 percent.
  17. Receipt of Funds Needed (quarterly, six months, annually): Funds will be paid as follows throughout the term of the project: 25 percent of total allocated funds at beginning of project; 25 percent of funds at end of first quarter-term (six months for two-year projects, etc.); 25 percent of funds at mid-term (one year for two-year projects, etc.); and Final 25 percent of funds at completion of project and receipt of final report. As noted on the Cover Sheet, Include Make Check Payable To... and to whom the check is to be mailed with a complete address.
  18. USPOULTRY will provide funding only to those scientists at universities or research organizations who comply with the provisions of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee as specified by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA in 9 CFR Part 1 (1-91).
  19. The following statement is required with all proposals and must be signed by an official of the university (or research organization) and the project leader. This statement must accompany the original proposal or the proposal will be returned before committee action.

    The (Department) of (University or Research Organization) agrees to provide the following to USPOULTRY:
    1. Progress reports on the research project every six months until the project is completed;
    2. Within three months following completion of the research funded, to provide the final project report (using the format for final reports) of the results;
    3. The University (or Research Organization) understands that USPOULTRY will retain 25 percent of the approved funds until the final report has been provided to the association; and
    4. Give permission to the association to provide the information to the industry. By accepting the funding provided by USPOULTRY and the USPOULTRY Foundation, the researcher grants to USPOULTRY the right and license to share the results of the research with, and provide links or copies of the final research report to, its membership and the research community through USPOULTRY's website, direct and electronic mail, or any other form of dissemination.

  20. Progress reports are required every six months. This can be a brief concise statement of progress toward the objectives of the project. This report does not need to include detailed charts or figures. A reminder of the progress reporting will be sent to the investigator just before the due date. If the progress report is more than 30 days late, an "alert" letter will be sent to the investigator and to the administrative office. Failure to reply within two weeks of this warning letter, a notification will be sent to the administrative officer and the investigator that no additional monies will be paid to that grant until the report has been received.
    Final reports: A reminder will be sent to the investigator of the need to provide a final report at the completion date. Final reports are due within three months following completion of the research project as specified by the research proposal. If the final report has not been received in 90 days following the reminder notice, an "alert" letter will be sent to the investigator and the administrative office. Failure to reply within two weeks of this warning letter, a notification will be sent to the administrative officer and the investigator that no additional monies will be paid to that institution (or research organization) until the report has been received.
  21. USPOULTRY makes no claim on discoveries or invention patents made by scientists/institutions utilizing USPOULTRY research funds. USPOULTRY assumes no liability associated with either the conduct of research or the outcome or use of research findings acquired with USPOULTRY funds.
  22. Authorized Signatures:
    1. Project Leader
    2. Department Head
    3. University or Research Organization Official

Submit projects to:
John R. Glisson, DVM, MAM, PhD
U. S. Poultry & Egg Association
1530 Cooledge Road
Tucker, GA 30084-7303

What is the format for final reports?
There are four separate parts to the final research report. These are:
(1) cover sheet,
(2) industry summary,
(3) scientific report, and
(4) list of presentations made and reports of publications.

Final Reports must be submitted via email in MICROSOFT WORD FORMAT. In addition, please submit two copies via U.S. Postal Service or overnight delivery. This Final Report should be loose, not bound.

(1) Cover Sheet
This single-page document provides the association with a means of filing and identifying the material. The arrangement of this page should be as follows:

Title
Investigator(s)
Name of University and University Address
Department
Date of Completion of Project
Statement: Funded by the U. S. Poultry & Egg Association

(2) Industry Summary (One Page)
This is a very important part of your final report and describes the potential usefulness of the research to the industry. It should briefly explain the conclusions that are drawn from the results. It should include few, if any, scientific tables but an evaluation of potential in terms of economics, increased quality, better performance, etc. Dollar figures are always valuable. The following format should be used with a minimum of technical terminology. This summary is intended for general industry consumption.
a. Briefly describe the problem that was studied;
b. Restate the objectives from the original proposal;
c. In the same order, state briefly the results achieved toward each objective of the project; and
d. Discuss the impact of the research results for industry.

(3) Scientific Report
The scientific report should be carefully written so as to substantiate the results and be of value to those who may wish to study the details of the experiment. There is no limit on the length of this report. The format is shown below.
a. Materials and methods used in the study. Should be in sufficient detail to allow for repeatability. If new techniques or tests have been developed as part of the objectives of the project, the specific protocol for the technique or test should
be included;
b. Results and discussion;
c. Tables and figures (can be inserted into the text where appropriate); and
d. References.

(4) List of Presentations and Publications
Please list the publications which were a result of this research either entirely or in part by this grant. Reprints would be appreciated when available.
Please indicate the presentations with the date, place, name of meeting, and title when the presentation was related to the research funded by USPOULTRY.

Submit final reports to:
John R. Glisson, DVM, MAM, PhD
U.S. Poultry & Egg Association
1530 Cooledge Road
Tucker, GA 30084-7303

USPOULTRY Accepting Nominations for Charles Beard Research Excellence Award

USPOULTRY and the USPOULTRY Foundation are accepting nominations from colleges and universities for the Charles Beard Research Excellence Award through July 1. The goal of this award is to recognize outstanding completed research projects, funded by USPOULTRY or the USPOULTRY Foundation, which have made a significant positive impact on the poultry industry. The nominee may be recognized for multiple completed USPOULTRY research projects, all focused on the same subject area.

Nominations can be solicited from the universities and research institutions that conduct poultry research, as well as from anyone in the research community or any USPOULTRY member, staff, and sponsored committee. Self-nominations are also allowed. Nominations should focus on research projects completed within the past five years, but may include projects completed at an earlier time if a project’s impact has only recently become recognized.

The recipient of the Charles Beard Research Excellence Award will be the primary researcher who conducted the recognized research project(s) and will receive round-trip transportation to and two nights lodging at the International Production & Processing Expo in Atlanta, GA. A cash prize of $1,500 will also be awarded.

The award will be presented at the IPPE at the International Poultry Scientific Forum. The award will be presented by Dr. Beard and the Chairman of the Foundation Research Advisory Committee (FRAC).

To submit a nomination, please send a letter to John Glisson (jglisson@uspoultry.org), which includes the nominee's name, a brief description of the nominee's research accomplishments and the impact of the research. It is not necessary to include the titles or dates of research grants. USPOULTRY staff can supply those details to the nomination.

USPOULTRY and its Foundation operate a comprehensive research program incorporating all phases of poultry and egg production and processing. Since the inception of the research program, USPOULTRY has reinvested more than $25 million dollars into the industry in the form of research grants, with the International Poultry Expo, part of IPPE, as the primary source for the funding. More than 50 universities and federal and state facilities have received grants over the years.

U.S. Poultry & Egg Association is an all-feather organization representing the complete spectrum of today's poultry industry, with a focus on progressively serving member companies through research, education, communication, and technical assistance. Founded in 1947, U.S. Poultry & Egg Association is based in Tucker, GA.

Exploration of Systemic Salmonella Infection in Chickens and Turkeys and Determination of the Relationship with Salmonella in Finished Ground Product

Background

Despite the application of on-farm controls and in-plant interventions, outbreaks of salmonellosis have been associated with ground poultry products. It has conventionally been assumed that Salmonella gets into ground poultry products as a result of surface contamination of the parts being ground. Based on this assumption the issue can best be addressed through good sanitary dressing practices accompanied with surface treatments such as dips and sprays.

An alternative hypothesis is that in some proportion of birds Salmonella becomes systemic at some point in their lives prior to slaughter. This event may then be associated with subsequent harborage of live Salmonella in a variety of tissues in the bird. Such harborage may not be mitigated using sanitary dressing practices or surface treatments and may then be a contributing factor to the introduction of Salmonella into finished ground poultry products. The research exploring the potential for Salmonella to become systemic in poultry is currently limited, but could have bearing on food safety if systemic infection results in the introduction of Salmonella into the finished ground product.

Research Questions

The objective of this RFP is to solicit proposals to address two main issues:

  • The potential for different Salmonella serotypes to cause systemic infection in poultry under various conditions; and,
  • The impact systemic infection has on the prevalence and number of Salmonella in the finished ground product.

Areas of Focus

Proposals should address some or all of the following research questions (presented in no order of priority) and should provide adequate detail regarding approach and methodology to allow evaluation of the likelihood of success.

  • The potential for different Salmonella serotypes to cause systemic infection in poultry under various conditions
    • Is this dependent on serotype? Particular attention should be placed on S. enteritidis, S. Heidelberg, and S. typhimurium.
    • Is this dependent on the type of animal (broiler vs turkey)?
    • Is this dependent on dose administered and/or mode of administration?
    • Is there a time dependency (how long does the organism persist)?
    • If Salmonella becomes systemic, in which tissues do the Salmonellae reside, for how long does it persist, and is it serotype dependent?

  • The impact systemic infection has on the prevalence and number of Salmonella in the finished ground product
    • Assuming Good Manufacturing Practices under appropriate conditions, does the grinding process or equipment influence the presence and levels of Salmonella in the finished product?
    • Are levels of Salmonella in the finished ground product dependent on the inputs (bird parts, method of deboning, skin on/off, etc.)?

Proposal Submission
Researchers should submit only a maximum two-page pre-proposal summary that describes the parts of the objectives they wish to address and what they propose to do. A title, the researcher's name, affiliation, and email address should be included in the pre-proposal. Details of procedures or specifics of the budget should not be included in the pre-proposal submission. Pre-proposals should be submitted in Microsoft Word format to vchalker@uspoultry.org. DEADLINE FOR PRE-PROPOSAL SUBMISSION IS APRIL 18, 2014.

The outcome of the pre-proposal review will be one of three responses from USPOULTRY:

  • Send a full research proposal for consideration.
  • Please make specific modifications in what you are proposing and send a full proposal.
  • Do not send a full research proposal.

Full proposals will follow established USPOULTRY guidelines as seen at www.uspoultry.org. Funds can be used for graduate students, technicians, research supplies, and work and meeting travel. Funds cannot be used for professional (faculty or postdoc) salaries or equipment purchase. Up to 15% overhead is allowed. No budget, including overhead, may exceed $125,000.

 

Investigation of the Influence of Transportation Conditions on Broilers and Turkeys

Background

Broilers and turkeys must be transported from farms to processing plants prior to slaughter. Transport equipment is designed to allow adequate airflow over and around the birds to provide dissipation of body heat during the summer and conservation of body heat during the winter. The seasonal variation in temperature requires poultry companies to seasonally adjust transport equipment to maintain the birds' well-being. The interaction of temperature, air speed, and humidity influences the well-being of birds during transport. By better understanding the factors which interact to cause thermal stress during transport, and establishing broad parameters and objective measurements for bird well-being, the poultry industry can further enhance the level of care provided to during transport.

Research Questions

The objective of this RFP is to solicit proposals to address two main issues:

  • What are objective measures of thermal well-being for broilers or turkeys during transport?
  • How do the conditions of transport affect these objective measures of thermal well-being?

Areas of Focus

  • The potential for the interaction of temperature, air speed, and humidity to cause thermal stress during transport.
    • How is this affected by adjusting transportation equipment, i.e. wind screens, tarps, etc?
    • How is this affected by precipitation or intentional wetting of birds?
    • Where in a transport trailer does thermal stress occur in various environmental conditions?
    • How is this affected by density, based on bird weight?
    • How is this affected by a bird's location on a transport trailer?

  • Methods to establish a range of conditions which provide a suitable environment for transport.
    • How can objective measures be used to establish a comfort range for broilers or turkeys during transport?
    • How can thermal stress be measured in various areas of a transport trailer?
    • How can the transportation process be monitored to detect thermal stress?

Proposal Submission
Researchers should submit only a maximum two-page pre-proposal summary that describes the parts of the objectives they wish to address and what they propose to do. A title, the researcher's name, affiliation, and email address should be included in the pre-proposal. Details of procedures or specifics of the budget should not be included in the pre-proposal submission. Pre-proposals should be submitted in Microsoft Word format to vchalker@uspoultry.org. DEADLINE FOR PRE-PROPOSAL SUBMISSION IS APRIL 18, 2014.

The outcome of the pre-proposal review will be one of three responses from USPOULTRY:

  • Send a full research proposal for consideration.
  • Please make specific modifications in what you are proposing and send a full proposal.
  • Do not send a full research proposal.

Full proposals will follow established USPOULTRY guidelines as seen at www.uspoultry.org. Funds can be used for graduate students, technicians, research supplies, and work and meeting travel. Funds cannot be used for professional (faculty or postdoc) salaries or equipment purchase. Up to 15% overhead is allowed. No budget, including overhead, may exceed $125,000.

 


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